Oleh: adiriyadhi | 19 Maret 2008

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY II

ELECTROLYTE
A chemical compound (salt, acid, or base) that dissociates into electrically charged ions when dissolved in a solvent. The resulting electrolyte (or electrolytic) solution is an ionic conductor of electricity. Very often, the so formed solution itself is simply called an “electrolyte.” Also, molten salts and molten salt solutions are often called “electrolyte” when used in electrochemical cells, see ionic liquid.

IRON
The most common and most useful metallic element, being of almost universal occurrence, usually in the form of an oxide (as hematite, magnetite, etc.), or a hydrous oxide (as limonite, turgite, etc.). It is reduced on an enormous scale in three principal forms; viz., cast iron, steel, and wrought iron. Iron usually appears dark brown, from oxidation or impurity, but when pure, or on a fresh surface, is a gray or white metal. It is easily oxidized (rusted) by moisture, and is attacked by many corrosive agents. Symbol Fe (Latin Ferrum). Atomic weight 55.9. Specific gravity, pure iron, 7.86; cast iron, 7.1. In magnetic properties, it is superior to all other substances. (siti mutoharoh)

TITRATION
Titration is a laboratory technique by which we can determine the concentration of an unknown reagent using a standard concentration of another reagent that chemically reacts with the unknown. This standard solution is referred to as the “titrant”. We have to have some way to determine when the reaction is complete that we are using. This is referred to as the “end point” or more technically the equivalence point. At that point all the unknown has been reacted with the standard titrant and some kind of chemical indicator must let us know when that point has been arrived at. (Eliawati addawiyah)

MAGNESIUM
A mineral involved in many processes in the body including nerve signaling, the building of healthy bones, and normal muscle contraction. About 350 enzymes are known to depend on magnesium. Magnesium is contained in all unprocessed foods. High concentrations of magnesium are contained in nuts, unmilled grains, dark-green leafy vegetables, legumes such as peas and beans, and fruit. Magnesium is thus readily available in foods that form the basis of a healthful diet. (Chika Rizka)


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